A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone

I think that the richest vein is somewhere hereabouts; so by the divining-rod and thin rising vapors I judge; and here I will begin to mine. For my part, I could easily do without the post-office. If we read of one man robbed, or murdered, or killed by accident, or one house burned, or one vessel wrecked, or one steamboat blown up, or one cow run over on the Western Railroad, or one mad dog killed, or one lot of grasshoppers in the winter—we never need read of another.

The intellect is a cleaver; it discerns and rifts its way into the secret of things. God himself culminates in the present moment, and will never be more divine in the lapse of all the ages.

When visitors came in larger and unexpected numbers there was but the third chair for them all, but they generally economized the room by standing up. However mean your life is, meet it and live it; do not shun it and call it hard names. We have built for this world a family mansion, and for the next a family tomb.

Its thin current slides away, but eternity remains.

“A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.”

It was suggestive somewhat as a picture in outlines. We are for the most part more lonely when we go abroad among men than when we stay in our chambers. I did not need to go outdoors to take the air, for the atmosphere within had lost none of its freshness.

Final lines Quotes about Walden[ edit ] Thoreau was The perch swallows the grub-worm, the pickerel swallows the perch, and the fisher-man swallows the pickerel; and so all the chinks in the scale of being are filled. I called on the king, but he made me wait in his hall, and conducted like a man incapacitated for hospitality.

Many of the phenomena of Winter are suggestive of an inexpressible tenderness and fragile delicacy. I do not see but a quiet mind may live as contentedly there, and have as cheering thoughts, as in a palace. Let our lakes receive as true names at least as the Icarian Sea, where "still the shore" a "brave attempt resounds.

If he is surrounded by mountainous circumstances, an Achillean shore, whose peaks overshadow and are reflected in his bosom, they suggest a corresponding depth in him. To a philosopher all news, as it is called, is gossip, and they who edit and read it are old women over their tea.

Why should we live with such hurry and waste of life? What right had the unclean and stupid farmer, whose farm abutted on this sky water, whose shores he has ruthlessly laid bare, to give his name to it?

When first I took up my abode in the woods, that is, began to spend my nights as well as days there, which, by accident, was on Independence Day, or the Fourth of July,my house was not finished for winter, but was merely a defence against the rainwithout plastering or chimney, the walls being of rough, weather-stained boards, with wide chinks, which made it cool at night.

An honest man has hardly need to count more than his ten fingers, or in extreme cases he may add his ten toes, and lump the rest.

Do not seek so anxiously to be developed, to subject yourself to many influences to be played on; it is all dissipation. There was something cosmical about it; a standing advertisement, till forbidden, of the everlasting vigor and fertility of the world.

We will consider what kind of music they are like. The upright white hewn studs and freshly planed door and window casings gave it a clean and airy look, especially in the morning, when its timbers were saturated with dew, so that I fancied that by noon some sweet gum would exude from them.

Our village life would stagnate if it were not for the unexplored forests and meadows which surround it. Compassion is a very untenable ground. As if Plato were my townsman and I never saw him— my next neighbor and I never heard him speak or attended to the wisdom of his words.

These same questions that disturb and puzzle and confound us have in their turn occurred to all the wise men; not one has been omitted; and each has answered them, according to his ability, by his words and his life.

Take shelter under the cloud, while they flee to carts and sheds. Be it life or death, we crave only reality. A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener. I drink at it; but while I drink I see the sandy bottom and detect how shallow it is.

Perhaps we need only to know how his shores trend and his adjacent country or circumstances, to infer his depth and concealed bottom. Give me the poverty that enjoys true wealth. There is more day to dawn. Often the poor man is not so cold and hungry as he is dirty and ragged and gross.A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone.

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Olympus is but the outside of the earth everywhere.

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All poets and heroes, like Memnon, are the children of Aurora, and emit their music at sunrise. “A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone.” ― Henry David Thoreau, Walden tags: afford, let-alone, natural, rich, wealth.

Nov 26,  · A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone? " a man is rich in proportion to the number of things in which he can afford to let alone."?

More questionsStatus: Resolved. Walden, Henry David Thoreau. STUDY. PLAY "A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone" People should measure their wealth by how much they can live without not what they have.

"If you are restricted in your range by poverty, if you cannot buy books and newspapers, for instance, you are but confined to. "for a man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone" Thoreau considered freedom and independence to do and learn as one pleases as the greatest luxury in life the greatest wealth.

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A man is rich in proportion to the number of things which he can afford to let alone
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